Are you living by yourself? Have you ever thought of moving back to your parents’ home? Warning: it can get you to experience unforeseen emotional conditions, according to some researches. Let’s check some of them out:

A recent research by Jennifer Caputo, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany. A move back home can be complicated for their mental health.

Another finding from a journal Society and Mental Health showed that norms about residential independence leave deep roots in youth. Moreover, per Caputo, this finding and a research indicating that disappointments in other areas of young people’s lives are mentally harmful, are a coincidence. It is something Caputo found out and believes in it.

A move back to parents’ home can be caused by losing a job or a relationship ending, the researchers noted. However, the study shows that coming home remains a significant cause of depression even after these factors.

There is no doubt, a successful transition to adult life and gaining independence are highly valued goals. If those are not achieved, there might be created feelings of failure.

In 2016. The Pew Research Center noted 15% of people ages 25 to 35 were living at their parents’ place. Therefore, there is a jump for 5% for millennials, compared with the 10% of generations Xers who were not living alone while they were at the same age. For the silent generation, the above-mentioned percent is double when they were the same age in 1964.

The Pew numbers didn’t specify didn’t have any records bout the people who are living with their parents but once they lived by themselves.

Almost 27% of young adults, aged 20-26 wouldn’t mind living with their parents in their early 30s. Another 11% said they’d be fine even when they’ll be 35 or older.